FAREWELL PAK RONNY!

On 22 May 2017, BBI (ACT) Board members farewelled Bpk Ronny Nur, the Indonesian Embassy’s Cultural Attache at a dinner in Canberra. Pak Ronny, a member of the BBI (ACT) Board, was praised for his energetic efforts to promote the teaching of Indonesian in schools and universities in the ACT and throughout Australia.  BBI (ACT) Chair, Heath McMichael, thanked Pak Ronny for his efforts in support of BBI (ACT)’s mandate to foster the learning of Indonesian and understanding of Indonesian culture within the broad community.  Heath noted Pak Ronny had lent BBI (ACT) valuable assistance in organising events at the Embassy’s Balai Kartini, for example, the Women in Poetry evening in 2014 and dinners for Indonesian language teachers in 2015 and 2016.  Vice Chair, George Quinn, said Pak Ronny’s contribution to a deeper understanding of Indonesian culture within Australia were recognised throughout Australia.  Board member, Amrih Widodo, said Pak Ronny, a trained scientist, had set a very high benchmark for future Cultural Attaches at the Indonesian Embassy.  All board members wished Pak Ronny well in his new role at the Agriculture Institute in Bogor. In thanking the Board, Pak Ronny said he regarded Australia with great warmth as his second home.  He looked forward to visiting Canberra from time to time when he visited Armidale in NSW as a visiting professor at the University of New England.

Selamat jalan Pak Ronny!

BBI (ACT) Board members farewell Pak Ronny

Pak Ronny saying farewell to Board members

Indonesian Teachers Applauded in Canberra Schools

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Teachers of Indonesian language in Canberra schools hosted at dinner by Balai Bahasa Indonesia (ACT) 11.9.15

The outstanding achievements of primary and secondary school teachers of the Indonesian language were honoured at a dinner hosted by the Balai Bahasa Indonesia (‘Indonesian Language Pavilion’) in Canberra on 11 September 2015. Around 40 past and present teachers exchanged classroom experiences teaching Indonesian at the function held at the Indonesian Embassy in Canberra. BBI (ACT) Chair and master of ceremonies for the dinner, Heath McMichael, told guests the challenge of promoting Indonesian language and culture in Australia is one not just for governments but for all community members who wanted to turn around the decline in the numbers of students taking up Asian languages. Addressing the dinner, Indonesian Ambassador to Australia, HE Mr Nadjib Riphat Kesoema, said the teaching of Indonesian in Australian schools added ballast to people-to-people relations between the two countries. BBI (ACT) hopes to recreate the warmth and camaraderie of the occasion at future events celebrating the efforts of teachers in line with its goal to promote Indonesian language and culture in the ACT and beyond.

Do you teach Indonesian or intend to become a teacher of Indonesian? Apply now for an Endeavour Language Teacher Fellowship

The Australian government is calling for applications for Endeavour Language Teacher Fellowships for 2013. The Fellowship provides in-country training for language teachers over three weeks in one of ten countries. It covers the cost of return airfares, accommodation, tuition, some meals, field trips and cultural activities in the coutnry of the language you teach.

The Indonesian option will be conducted by the Indonesia Australia Language Foundation in Denpasar, Bali, in January 2013. The program has an intensive language study component backed up with cultural studies and field trips around the island of Bali.

For more information go to: http://www.eltf.austraining.com.au/

 

“Send 10,000 young Australians a year to Indonesia to learn Indonesian,” says security analyst Professor Hugh White

One of Australia’s leading security analysts, the ANU’s Professor Hugh White, has taken the Australian government and people to task for their neglect of Indonesia (The Age, May 29, 2012). Australia is too preoccupied with “a kaleidoscope of negative images” he says, and is “missing the big story.” The big story is that Indonesia’s economy is growing so strongly it will likely be the fourth largest in the world by 2040. “Our big neighbour,” says White, “will then be three or four times richer than us. Already its GDP has overtaken ours by about 15 per cent.”

Professor White warns that Australians are kidding themselves if they think Indonesia needs Australian help to succeed. “No one likes receiving charity, especially from neighbours,” he writes. “Those who offer it are more often resented than thanked. In fact, the more Indonesia grows, the more our aid program damages rather than fosters the kinds of links we want with them.” White urges Australia to give Indonesia much higher priority in foreign policy.

Read the full text of Professor White’s views at: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/indonesias-rise-is-the-big-story-were-missing-20120528-1zf72.html

In a related interview on ABC Radio (The World Today, May 22, 2012) Professor White calls for the establishment of a program to send 10,000 young Australians a year to Indonesia to learn Indonesian. “When young British people want to learn French, they go to France. When young Australians want to learn Bahasa, they should go to Indonesia.” he says. Australia should have “an imperative to build a relationship which maximises the chances that we can work together – that’s going to be in our interest as Indonesia becomes stronger.”

Read the text of Professor White’s remarks and listen to audio of his interview with the ABC’s Eleanor Hall at: http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2012/s3508221.htm .

Many Australian employers do not value Indonesia literacy skills, Arjuna Dibley and Rebecca Cole report

“Where individuals are equipped with in-depth knowledge about Indonesia, they are able to work in the Indonesian economy in new and creative ways,” write Arjuna Dibley and Rebecca Cole in the Lowy Institute’s Interpreter web site (8 March, 2012). Both are members of the Australia-Indonesia Youth Association (http://www.facebook.com/AIYANational)

But a survey by the the Australia-Indonesia Youth Association has found that Australian employers often do not value or do not make use of employees with Indonesian-literacy skills. “For instance, 40% of AIYA’s respondents found that their Indonesian literacy was not valued by employers when they applied for jobs, with several employers considering this a strange area of study.”

Arjuna Dibley and Rebecca Cole are graduates of the Indonesian studies program at the Australian National University. Both have studied and worked in Indonesia. Read their opinion piece in full at: http://www.lowyinterpreter.org/post/2012/03/08/Indonesia-literacy-in-decline.aspx